BASICS Scotland Podcast
LisaJane Naidoo - Scottish Ambulance Services pathways around child protection

LisaJane Naidoo - Scottish Ambulance Services pathways around child protection

September 20, 2021

LisaJane chats us through the pathways for identifying and supporting children at risk, how this fits into the Getting it Right For Each Child (GIRFEC) model and how this fits into a multi-agency approach for that child. 

 

Biography

Lisa Jane is the clinical effectiveness lead for child protection at the Scottish ambulance service.   

 

Top 3 tips 

1) Go with your gut, if you are feeling stressed or intimidated in an environment, imagine how a child feels within that environment 

2) Don’t ever assume that someone else will escalate a concern on your behalf.  It doesn’t matter how many refferals are made they are still all relevant and there is power within those referrals 

3) If you have any dubiety then escalate it, don’t ever disregard your own feelings in any situation. 

 

Resources/links 

Child Protection Guidance for Health Professionals (www.gov.scot) 

 GIRFEC National Practice Model - gov.scot (www.gov.scot) 

 Contextual Safeguarding Network – The Contextual Safeguarding programme, and the team who deliver it, are part of the International Centre: Researching child sexual exploitation, violence and trafficking (IC) at the University of Bedfordshire 

Mary Munro - Drug harm reduction and the naloxone - take home project

Mary Munro - Drug harm reduction and the naloxone - take home project

September 13, 2021

Mary chats to us about the interface between the emergency 999 services and the day to day problems associated with drugs and addiction 

 

Top 3 tips 

1) By understanding why someone may use substances, the importance of our use  of language and knowledge of what services are available to support we can  help people into a journey of recovery and stop preventable drug related   deaths. 

2) Harm Reduction is not about encouraging drug use, but allows people to use  drugs in a safer way.  

3) Take Home Naloxone saves life’s, you can’t recover if your dead! By carrying  and providing a THN kit, we can keep people alive, create connections and help  people to treatment and support services to help them into a journey or recovery. 

 

Biography

Mary Munro is the clinical effectiveness lead for drug harm reduction in the North of Scotland, for the Scottish Ambulance Service.  Mary came to the Scottish Ambulance Service with experience in various substance use settings including: research, education, third sector and clinical inpatient and community nursing roles. People who use substances can often be seen and treated by society and health services as “less than” human, and we all have a part to play in changing these attitudes and cultures. 

 

Pete Davis - Damage control resuscitation

Pete Davis - Damage control resuscitation

September 6, 2021

Pete talks us through the definition of damage control resuscitation and the application of this concept to critically injured patients in the pre-hospital setting. The discussion ranges from the practicalities of delivery to novel therapies sitting on the horizon. 

Top 3 tips: 

  1. Remember that the classic ABC algorithm has morphed into CABC and that C stands for the control of catastrophic haemorrhage. This has to be immediate and concurrent with managing the airway, breathing and circulation.
  2. Nail your IV lines!  If a red team is on the way but you are on scene, you may be the one who has the best chance to place the IV cannula which is going to facilitate further resuscitation.  Place it and make sure it is really secure. 
  3. You can extend the classic algorithm from "ABCDE" to "CABCDEF" where “F” stands for forward planning.  So immediately you are activated and en-route, start planning ahead and consider what other services you may need.  If on scene you recognise a severe derangement in physiology activate the red or HEMS team as appropriate; the earlier these teams and the receiving facility receive patient information - the better they are able to allocate their resources. 

 

Biography: 

Pete qualified in medicine in 1987 and has served in the UK Defence Medical Services ever since, apart from a nine-year sabbatical in New Zealand during which time he trained in helped to produce three children, trained in Emergency Medicine and explored the Southern Alps. He is a Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Retrieval Medicine, working between the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow and the Emergency Medical Retrieval Service (a component of the Scottish Specialist Transfer And Retrieval Service - ScotSTAR) when not deployed on Regimental duties. A climber and skier since his teenage years, these sports have taken him on adventures throughout the world and continue to foster his passion for Wilderness Medicine. 

Pete Davis - Damage control resuscitation

Pete Davis - Damage control resuscitation

August 30, 2021

Pete talks us through the definition of damage control resuscitation and the application of this concept to critically injured patients in the pre-hospital setting. The discussion ranges from the practicalities of delivery to novel therapies sitting on the horizon. 

Top 3 tips: 

  1. Remember that the classic ABC algorithm has morphed into CABC and that C stands for the control of catastrophic haemorrhage. This has to be immediate and concurrent with managing the airway, breathing and circulation.
  2. Nail your IV lines!  If a red team is on the way but you are on scene, you may be the one who has the best chance to place the IV cannula which is going to facilitate further resuscitation.  Place it and make sure it is really secure. 
  3. You can extend the classic algorithm from "ABCDE" to "CABCDEF" where “F” stands for forward planning.  So immediately you are activated and en-route, start planning ahead and consider what other services you may need.  If on scene you recognise a severe derangement in physiology activate the red or HEMS team as appropriate; the earlier these teams and the receiving facility receive patient information - the better they are able to allocate their resources. 

 

Biography: 

Pete qualified in medicine in 1987 and has served in the UK Defence Medical Services ever since, apart from a nine-year sabbatical in New Zealand during which time he trained in helped to produce three children, trained in Emergency Medicine and explored the Southern Alps. He is a Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Retrieval Medicine, working between the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow and the Emergency Medical Retrieval Service (a component of the Scottish Specialist Transfer And Retrieval Service - ScotSTAR) when not deployed on Regimental duties. A climber and skier since his teenage years, these sports have taken him on adventures throughout the world and continue to foster his passion for Wilderness Medicine. 

Stuart Manwell - The Scottish Major Trauma Network and the Major Trauma Triage Tool

Stuart Manwell - The Scottish Major Trauma Network and the Major Trauma Triage Tool

August 23, 2021

Stuart chats us through the Scottish Trauma network, what a major trauma centre is and the major trauma triage tool, helping us get the right patient to the right place at the right time. 

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Stuart is a Paramedic with the Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS) based in Paisley and is currently the Project Lead Major Trauma Triage Tools (MTTT). Stuart started his SAS career as a Community First Responder with Neilston and Uplawmoor First Responders who were awarded the Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service in 2018. Stuart has been involved since the group was established and is still hugely involved with their work.

Stuart was appointed as Project Lead Major Trauma Triage Tools (MTTT) at the start of the year to roll out the MTTTs. “The Scottish Ambulance Service is a fundamental part of the STN and this is a really exciting time for us as the MTTTs will allow paramedics and technicians to triage patients to definitive care wherever possible”.

 

3 TOP TIPS

 

  • Utilise the MTTT where applicable. Apply the MTTT to all significantly injured patients or those involved in high mechanism incidents.
  • If you need any support contact the Trauma Desk. Whether it is clinical, logistical or requesting the support of advanced teams contact to Trauma Desk when needed.
  • Documentation of the MTTT when used is key. If the MTTT is applied to any patient whether they are major trauma positive, negative or whatever hospital they are conveyed to document the use of the MTTT.
Fiona Stevenson - Child protection in the community

Fiona Stevenson - Child protection in the community

August 16, 2021

Fiona talks us through our responsibilities to the child in the community, what red flags to look for and what we can do about our concerns. 

 

Bio 

I am a Registered Mental Health Nurse.  I specialised in adult addiction and the impact this has on children and young people.  I have worked across both statutory and non-statutory agencies including Youth Justice and was the lead nurse for child protection across Glasgow city addiction services and then the Lead Officer for Glasgow Child Protection committee. My focus of keeping children safe from harm began over 20 years ago when I took on the role of working with children and families affected by substance misuse.  I am currently a consultant in Child Protection with a children’s charity in Scotland and recently became a short-break foster carer and Independent Foster Panel Member. 

Top 3 tips 

  1. Do not be worried about getting it wrong, better to get it working than do nothing at all. 
  1. Seek advice, do not feel you are one your own. 
  1. Remember that children and young people need adults to keep them safe from harm and abuse.  It is everyone job.   

 

Resources/links 

Getting it right for every child (GIRFEC) https://www.gov.scot/policies/girfec/ 

Aebhric O’Kelly - Prolonged field care in remote areas

Aebhric O’Kelly - Prolonged field care in remote areas

August 9, 2021

Aebhric focuses on some aspects and some hints and tips for delivering prolonged field care in remote areas 

 

Biography

 

Aebhric is a former US Army Green Beret, a Psychologist and a board-certified Critical Care Paramedic. He is the dean for the College of Remote and Offshore Medicine Foundation which offers medical education programmes for the remote, austere and offshore industries. Aebhric taught on the NATO Special Operations Combat Medic course in Pfullendorf, Germany and taught Battlefield Advanced Trauma Life Support (BATLS) for the MoD. He has earned the Diploma Tropical Nursing from LSHTM and is currently writing a clinical doctorate from the University of Stirling. 

 

Top tips 

  1. Be. Here. Now. This is a survival technique from the bookDeep Survival. It forces you to be in the moment and not be blinded by the stress of the situation. 
  2. I always strive to be the dumbest person in the room. If I am in a room where I am the smartest person, I am in the wrong room. I need people around me who challenge me to be better. 
  3. Always be hungry. Hungry for learning. Hungry to continually better yourself.

 

JP Loughrey - Major Incidents  - Part 2

JP Loughrey - Major Incidents - Part 2

August 2, 2021

Over the next few weeks we will run a series of podcasts on Major incidents.  Throughout the series Dr JP Loughrey talks through how the services prepare, what resources are available, some of the lessons learned from major incidents and communication and triage.

 

Top tips  

  • Communicate effectively, using a recognized framework for consistency (METHANE) 
  • Realistic Medicine is an accurate representation of what we should strive for, even in a Major Incident 
  • Practice, train, drill, tabletop - anything you can do to ensure you’ve looked at the plan and action cards and know the principles will help when the pressure (and stakes) are high.  

Resources and links 

 

Twitter handle @Jploughrey 

 

Stephen pinker The better angels of our nature 

https://stevenpinker.com/publications/better-angels-our-nature

 

EMRS app 

https://www.emrsscotland.org/news/2015/5/14/emrs-app

 

Prometheus app 

https://www.prometheusmedical.co.uk/news/prometheus-methane-app-now-free

 

OS locate app 

https://shop.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/os-locate-faq/ 

 

JESSIP app 

https://www.jesip.org.uk/jesip-app 

 

National Ambulance Resilience Unit - Triage sieve 

http://naru.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/NARU-TRIAGE-SIEVE-JU5A304D.pdf 

 

 

NHS England - Clinical Guidelines for Major Incidents 

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/clinical-guidelines-for-major-incidents-and-mass-casualty-events

 

Biography

JP is a Consultant in EM in the QEUH Glasgow, and Retrieval Medicine with EMRS in the West of Scotland, with a particular interest in major incidents, As the ScotSTAR lead for Major Incident planning he has been involved in several large-scale incidents and training exercises. He keeps himself exceedingly busy, between his working life and his energetic young family! 

JP Loughrey - Major incidents

JP Loughrey - Major incidents

July 26, 2021

Over the next few weeks we will run a series of podcasts on Major incidents.  Throughout the series Dr JP Loughrey talks through how the services prepare, what resources are available, some of the lessons learned from major incidents and communication and triage.

 

Top tips  

  • Communicate effectively, using a recognized framework for consistency (METHANE) 
  • Realistic Medicine is an accurate representation of what we should strive for, even in a Major Incident 
  • Practice, train, drill, tabletop - anything you can do to ensure you’ve looked at the plan and action cards and know the principles will help when the pressure (and stakes) are high.  

Resources and links 

 

Twitter handle @Jploughrey 

 

Stephen pinker The better angels of our nature 

https://stevenpinker.com/publications/better-angels-our-nature

 

EMRS app 

https://www.emrsscotland.org/news/2015/5/14/emrs-app

 

Prometheus app 

https://www.prometheusmedical.co.uk/news/prometheus-methane-app-now-free

 

OS locate app 

https://shop.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/os-locate-faq/ 

 

JESSIP app 

https://www.jesip.org.uk/jesip-app 

 

National Ambulance Resilience Unit - Triage sieve 

http://naru.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/NARU-TRIAGE-SIEVE-JU5A304D.pdf 

 

 

NHS England - Clinical Guidelines for Major Incidents 

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/clinical-guidelines-for-major-incidents-and-mass-casualty-events

 

Biography

JP is a Consultant in EM in the QEUH Glasgow, and Retrieval Medicine with EMRS in the West of Scotland, with a particular interest in major incidents, As the ScotSTAR lead for Major Incident planning he has been involved in several large-scale incidents and training exercises. He keeps himself exceedingly busy, between his working life and his energetic young family! 

BASICS Scotland Podcast moves to weekly episodes!

BASICS Scotland Podcast moves to weekly episodes!

July 21, 2021

A very big thank you to all our listeners for your continued support since our launch in January. 

13,000 listens to date and going strong. Our Wednesday episodes were posts taken from our website prior to expanding onto Apple, Google and Spotify. Now we have caught up with them, we will be moving to a weekly release, at the same time of Monday at 12pm. We have many fascinating topics with leading pre-hospital experts scheduled over the coming months.

As always, if you have any suggestions for podcasts you would be interested in hearing, please do get in touch.

 

 

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