BASICS Scotland Podcast
Mark Worrall - Seizures in the Paediatric Patient

Mark Worrall - Seizures in the Paediatric Patient

April 11, 2022

Mark chats us through seizures in the paediatric patient from febrile convulsions to status epilepticus 

Top Tips: 

  1. Follow your ABCDE
  2. Don’t ever forget glucose
  3. Buccal midazolam or if you are really stuck intranasal midazolam if you can't get it in the mouth and they have been seizing for more than 5 minutes

Biography:

Mark is a Paediatric Intensivist at Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow, a consultant in Paediatric Critical Care Transport at ScotSTAR and a responder and Co -Director for pre-Hospital care for BASICS Scotland.  His interests include the management of critically unwell children anywhere.  

Mark Worrall - Paediatric Respiratory Emergencies part 2

Mark Worrall - Paediatric Respiratory Emergencies part 2

April 4, 2022

Mark chats us through commonly occurring respiratory disorders such as wheezing, asthma, breath stacking, pneumonia and COVID in the paediatric patient 

 

Top Tips: 

  1. Take your time and ask questions to try and work out where in the respiratory tract the problem is.  A good history will aid this
  2. Keep it simple
  3. Try and keep the child and family calm

 

Resources: 

Resuscitation council UK Paediatric basic life support guidelines   

Paediatric basic life support Guidelines | Resuscitation Council UK 

 

Biography:

Mark is a Paediatric Intensivist at Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow, a consultant in Paediatric Critical Care Transport at ScotSTAR and a responder and Co-Director for pre-Hospital care for BASICS Scotland. His interests include the management of critically unwell children anywhere.   

Mark Worrall - Paediatric Respiratory Emergencies part 1

Mark Worrall - Paediatric Respiratory Emergencies part 1

March 30, 2022

Mark chats us through the commonly occurring respiratory disorders of choking, epiglottitis, croup and bronchiolitis. 

 

Top Tips: 

  1. Take your time and ask questions to try and work out where in the respiratory tract the problem is.  A good history will aid this
  2. Keep it simple
  3. Try and keep the child and family calm

 

 

  

Resources: 

Resuscitation council UK Paediatric basic life support guidelines   

Paediatric basic life support Guidelines | Resuscitation Council UK 

 

Biography:

Mark is a Paediatric Intensivist at Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow, a consultant in Paediatric Critical Care Transport at ScotSTAR and a responder and Co-Director for pre-Hospital care for BASICS Scotland. His interests include the management of critically unwell children anywhere.   

 

 

Mark Worrall - Anaphylaxis in the paediatric child

Mark Worrall - Anaphylaxis in the paediatric child

March 21, 2022

Introduction:

Mark chats us through anaphylaxis in children and how we can treat them 

 

3 Top Tips: 

  • When you are assessing a child, think could this be anaphylaxis in your differential
  • Always look up the dose
  • Hydrocortisone and chlorophenamine are not now initial satges of children in anaphylaxis

  

Resources: 

Resuscitation council Guidance for healthcare proifessionals : anaphylaxis 

Emergency treatment of anaphylactic reactions: Guidelines for healthcare providers | Resuscitation Council UK 

 

Biography:

Mark is a Paediatric Intensivist at Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow, a consultant in Paediatric Critical Care Transport at ScotSTAR and a responder and Co -Director for pre-Hospital care for BASICS Scotland.  His interests include the management of critically unwell children anywhere.  

Caitlin Wilson - Hyperventilation Syndrome

Caitlin Wilson - Hyperventilation Syndrome

March 14, 2022

Caitlin Chats us through hyperventilation syndrome, classically referred to as “panic attack” and how we can spot it and treat the syndrome  

 

Top 3 tips: 

  • Keep an open mind – Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) is a diagnosis of exclusion! 
  • Use your diagnostic tools & clinical judgement - Don’t guess what findings might be! 
  • Be cautious when diagnosing HVS in older patients or when you’re uncertain in HVS being the sole diagnosis + safety net the patient when considering non-conveyance! 

 

Biography: 

Caitlin Wilson is a paramedic for North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust and conducted a research study on Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) as part of her MSc Clinical Research Methods in 2015/16. Caitlin went on to publish findings from her research and was involved in updating the JRCALC guidelines for HVS. Currently, Caitlin is undertaking a PhD in prehospital feedback at the University of Leeds funded by the NIHR Yorkshire and Humber Patient Safety Translational Research Centre. 

Links and resources: 

Wilson, C., Harley, C., & Steels, S. (2020). How accurate is the prehospital diagnosis of hyperventilation syndrome?. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 12(11). doi:10.12968/jpar.2020.12.11.445 

Wilson, C. (2018). Hyperventilation syndrome: diagnosis and reassurance. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 10(9), 370-375. doi:10.12968/jpar.2018.10.9.370 

Wilson, C., Harley, C., & Steels, S. (2018). Systematic review and meta-analysis of pre-hospital diagnostic accuracy studies. Emergency Medicine Journal, 35(12), 757-764. doi:10.1136/emermed-2018-207588 

 

 

Gail Topping - Are you OK?

Gail Topping - Are you OK?

March 7, 2022

Top 3 tips 

  • Put your own oxygen mask on first. Take the time to look after yourself first - you can’t help anyone else if you’re running on empty. Even if it’s just 5 mins for a cuppa and a chance to unwind, take that time. 
  • Don’t be afraid to talk about mental health. If you’re concerned about someone else, ask them if they’re okay, but make sure to ask them twice because most people’s first response will be something like “I’m fine, just tired”.  
  • Always be kind. None of us know what anyone else is coping with, either at work or in their personal life. We could all benefit from people being kinder to each other. It could be the little bit of light in someone’s day that helps them keep going.   

 

Resources 

https://www.lifelines.scot/ 

  

https://www.ruok.org.au/ 

  

https://www.samh.org.uk/ 

  

https://www.mind.org.uk/news-campaigns/campaigns/blue-light-programme/ 

  

https://royalfoundation.com/mental-health/ 

  

https://drdavidhamilton.com/the-5-side-effects-of-kindness/ 

  

Books  

The Mental Health And Wellbeing Of Healthcare Practitioners - Esther Murray and Jo Brown (includes a chapter on our campaign) 

 
The Little Book Of Kindness - Dr David Hamilton 

 

Biography

I've worked in the SAS for over 22 years, initially in ACC before moving to operational duties and I've been based in West Lothian ever since. My mental health has been negatively affected by some harrowing incidents I have responded to and I became frustrated by the lack of support sometimes being offered afterwards, so Ruth Anderson and I developed a campaign for informal peer support. It was called “R U OK?”, based on the Australian mental health charity, and I hope it helped promote conversations about mental health and well-being within the SAS. 

Dave Strachan - Suspension Trauma

Dave Strachan - Suspension Trauma

February 28, 2022

Our own Dave Strachan become the interviewee and discusses suspension trauma

 

Top 3 tips 

1 Suspension trauma happens quickly so be aware!

2 We, the rescuers, are potentially the cause of some of this so in an MRT or technical rescue think about patient position and getting patients to move their limbs where possible

3 Look at the data! Understanding of this condition is changing rapidly as more research is carried out.

 

Resources and links 

https://www.wemjournal.org/action/showPdf?pii=S1080-6032%2820%2930070-3 

  

https://www.wemjournal.org/action/showPdf?pii=S1080-6032%2819%2930164-4 

  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7346344/pdf/cureus-0012-00000008514.pdf 

  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6602116/pdf/ham.2018.0089.pdf 

  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2658225/pdf/237.pdf 

 

Biography:

 

Dave started working in pre hospital care in 2006 as an event medic and member of Tayside Mountain Rescue. When he finally graduated from Dundee in 2014 he had spent just enough of the intervening years not having fun in the hills to actually qualify as a Doctor. Currently a Captain in Royal Army Medical Corps, he now holds diplomas in Leadership, the Management of Conflict and Catastrophe and Immediate Medical Care. He has climbed and led expeditions on 5 continents and spent most of the past few years deployed on operational tours and military exercises around the world.

At home in Pitlochry, Dave can be found responding for BASICS, playing ‘hide and seek’ with the rescue team or running (slowly) around the hills looking for things to climb.

 

April Lochhead - Falls in the community

April Lochhead - Falls in the community

February 21, 2022

April talks us through falls in the community, how we can treat and refer these patients ensuring the right care at the time in the right place 

Top 3 tips: 

  1. Always establish a patient's baseline and compare this to their presenting complaint for realistic assessment 
  1. Consider potential detrimental impacts to patients with an unnecessary ED admission 
  1. Engage with local falls pathways and use Prof to Prof links. 

 

Biography: 

April has 31 years of clinical background in NHS Scotland. April is a a trained Occupational Therapist and has worked in a variety of areas.  Starting off in mental health then in-patients, stroke and care of the elderly and laterally her career has been in the evolution of discharge teams to community care and then with Health and Social care partnership Greater Glasgow and Clyde. 

Her interest in frontline services started with a specialist role in trauma orthpaedics , addressing supported discharge and admission avoidance.  This work developed into A&E patient assessment, intermediate care and projects with the Scottish Ambulance Service. 

April is presently with The Scottish Ambulance Service on a 2 year secondment and believes that she is the first Occupational Therapist within the service.  It is her hope to establish a sustainable model to support patients and crews to utilise and embrace all components of health and social care that can provide best outcomes to patients who present to the ambulance teams with falls and frailty.  

April is passionate about patients having the right care at the right place with informed choice, and embracing new and innovative options and models of practice. 

 

 

 

Winston de Mello - Prehospital management of burns

Winston de Mello - Prehospital management of burns

February 14, 2022

Winston chats to us about burns and the treatment of these in the prehospital environment 

 

Top 3 tips: 

  1. Take a SAFE approach 
  1. Stop the burning process 
  1. Cool the burn but not the patient 

 

Biography: 

 

Dr de Mello undertook his medical training at Guy’s Hospital and Southampton. He served in the RAMC as a Regular and Reservist from 1976 to 2013 ending his military career as Colonel TA BATLS from 2007-2013. His NHS employment as an Anaesthetist and Pain Medicine Physician was at Mid Yorkshire and Manchester University Hospital. His clinical interests include pelvic pain, burns, pre-hospital care and trauma. He is a Founding Member of the Pre-Hospital Care Faculty at the Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh and the College of Remote & Offshore Medicine at Malta. He retired in 2020 and is Trustee at the Vulval Pain Society UK and Chair of the Pre-hospital SIG at the British Burns Association. 

 

 

Links and resources:

 

Clinical Pearls: 

  • Take a SAFE approach: Shout for help, Approach with care, Free from danger and Evaluate the ABCs 
  • Stop the burning process by getting the victim to drop to the floor and roll, remove clothing and jewelry 
  • Provide supplemental oxygen after clearing the airway 
  • Check both radial pulses 
  • If a burn patient is hypotensive within a couple of hours of the injury look for another source of blood loss – check the mechanism of injury 
  • Stop the burning process 
  • Cool the burn for a minimum of 20 minutes using cool water for up to 3 hours post burn 
  • Keep patient warm 
  • Loosely cover the burn with clingfilm 
  • Sit up (if permissible) especially in burns involving the head and neck to minimize the swelling 
  • Clingfilm also provides analgesia 
  • Beware circumferential burns 
  • The normal oximeter cannot detect carbon monoxide – and will falsely give a high saturation reading 
  • Fluid resuscitation in adults in pre-hospital burns can be simplified by adopting the   “small man, small burn small bag; big burn, big man big bag” – which simplifies to either a 500 ml or 1000 ml bag of Hartmann’s Solution intravenously/intraosseously per hour 
  • TBSA calculation in the pre-hospital can be difficult and is usually overestimated 
  • Electrical burns may need 24hour ECG monitoring in vulnerable patients 
  • Chemical contamination needs copious irrigation with water ideally within 10 minutes of contact except for elemental sodium, potassium or lithium 
  • Alkali burns are worse than acid 

 

 

 

 

Winter break!

Winter break!

November 29, 2021

Over December and the festive period your favourite podcast will be taking a short break to work on new episodes and plan for 2022. 

if there is a subject you would be keen for us to explore, do get in touch, we would love to hear from you! 

From the team at BASICS Scotland Podcast 

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